New job in a school library

In January I started working in a school library. It’s my first job in a school library – previously I worked for a publisher. The school is an independent secondary school for girls in North London. It also has a junior school, which has a library with its own librarian.

The library I work in is for all students from Years 7 – 13. It has fiction and non-fiction books (classified using the Dewey Decimal system), DVDs, newspapers, magazines and subscriptions to electronic resources, including JSTOR, the Economist, the British Medical Journal and Encyclopaedia Britannica. There are two librarians – myself and the senior librarian. The senior librarian is based in the Sixth Form Centre where she supervises the sixth form study areas.

The library space is generous for what is not a very large school campus. It is also in the middle of the school so easily accessible. The fiction area has comfy chairs and bean bags; the non fiction area has space for quiet study and six computers. There are also two ‘seminar rooms’ for group work or meetings.

My main duties are answering user enquiries about the library and its resources, processing circulation transactions, overseeing the study areas, providing library inductions and routine shelving and stock tidying. Promoting reading for pleasure and reading around one’s subjects are also part of the job, which can take the form of giving book recommendations and contributing reviews to a blog on the Virtual Learning Environment, Firefly.

My first two terms in the job were very much about learning the ropes. Coincidentally, the Year 7s only began to have full access to the library when I arrived (due to building work in the previous term) so I gave them inductions at the same time as I was learning my own way around. Each Year 7 class has one 45-minute lesson in the library a fortnight where they are shown how to use the library, contribute book reviews to Firefly, use the online resources and more. Some sessions pupils are just allowed to read, especially around exam time.

In April, our LMS supplier, Access-It, gave a workshop at the school on a new version of the software that will soon be released. The new version will have more options for how to customise the OPAC. For example, it will be possible to add a blog to the homepage and it will be easier to catalogue electronic resources. Comparing the OPAC to OPACs for university libraries has been interesting. Certain features – such as visual search (allowing you to search using a visual symbol rather than a keyword, like in the International Children’s Digital Library) – show the ways in which systems can be geared specifically towards younger users.

The school runs a scheme whereby all pupils are lent an iPad throughout their time at the school. I see a lot of children opting to read books on their iPads but there are also plenty who still choose to read physical books. The library is considering introducing a scheme which would allow pupils to borrow ebooks and audiobooks from Haringey’s digital library service.

Next year, plans include organising author visits and taking part in the Carnegie Shadowing Scheme. This scheme allows pupils to shadow the judges of the Carnegie Medal by reviewing books on the judges’ shortlist. They can post reviews to the scheme’s website and find out about other school groups taking part in their area.

Overall I’ve enjoyed my first two terms a lot but still have a lot to learn. Questions I have been pondering over the summer include the best way to introduce DDC to Year 7s, how to create more space for certain collections, how to encourage reluctant readers, how to develop the comics and manga collections and more. As I embark on my first full academic year with the school I should have lots to reflect upon in this blog. I have also started contributing book reviews to Good Reads (to share some of the reviews I’m giving to pupils), which can be seen on the right-hand side of this blog.

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